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ABC MONTHLY NEWSLETTER

MARCH 2019

Welcome to Our Monthly Newsletter!

We hope you will enjoy this month's articles.  

This month's topics are:   

MISCELLANEOUS

March 2019 RCAD Specials

ORIENTAL RUGS

                              Talish Oriental Rugs

NATURAL FIBERS

Hemp Natural Fiber

HEALTH CONCERNS

Portable Heaters

If there is a topic you would like us to cover in one of our upcoming newsletters, please call us at 

607-272-1566 

or contact us by clicking here.


GREAT NEWS!


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RCAD SPECIAL for 2019

March 1st through March 30th
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CARPET CLEANING 

20% Off

for the Entire Period!

CHECK OUT OUR CARPET CLEANING ARTICLES here and here.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

MARCH RCAD ONLY

TILE & GROUT CLEANING

& SEALING

50% Off

CHECK OUT OUR ARTICLES ON TILE & GROUT CLEANING Articles here.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 MORE DISCOUNTS ALSO AVAILABLE!

Services paid with cash qualify for an EXTRA 5% off.

CALL ABC at 607-272-1566 for more information and more discounts!

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Discounts applied to services MUST be above our minimum charges and CANNOT be combined with other discounts.
  • Services must be performed in the month they are offered only.

 TALISH ORIENTAL RUGS

LOCATION

Talish oriental rugs are one of the more important of the antique Caucasus rugs woven by the Talish people in the Southern Caucasian mountain region now known as the Republic of Azerbaijan near the Iranian border.

The other notable rugs from the Southern Caucasian area include the Kazak, Karabagh, Gendje, Moghan, and  Shirvan rugs. The major Northern Caucasian rugs include the Kuba, Derbend, and Dagestan.

HISTORY

The Talish (Talysh) tribe dates back to the 13th century and perhaps even earlier. In the 15th century they lived on the Moghan Steppe and the Southeastern Caspian shore. The region was known as Talish even in ancient times and was one of the earliest inhabited regions of what is now Azerbaijan.

The area was known as the Talish Khanate, which was established in Persia (Iran) in the middle of the 18th century and lasted until the beginning of the 19th century. It consisted of the SE part of the modern day Azerbaijan and the eastern tip of NW Iran. The capital was Lenkoran and it was inhabited mainly by the Talish people and the Azerbaijanis.

After Persia was defeated in the Russo-Persian War of 1826-28, the Talish Khanate was dissolved and became part of the Russian Empire.

The Talish people are Shia Muslim. As might be expected from their location, their culture and traditions have deeply integrated with the Azerbaijanis. Many of them are bilingual, speaking both their native Talish language as well as Azerbaijani.

CONSTRUCTION OF TALISH ORIENTAL RUGS

The warps (up and down cords) consist of 2 ply twisted and undyed beige and brown wool.

The wefts (side to side cords) always have 2 strands and are usually gray cotton.

The selvages (sides) are typically blue.

The knot is the symmetrical Turkish or Giordes.

The pile is fine wool of medium length.

DESIGN OF ANTIQUE TALISH ORIENTAL RUGS

Talish oriental rugs are one of the easiest to recognize of the Caucasian rugs because of their long narrow shape and distinctive design. 

Typically, they are 2 to 3 times as long as they are wide with a plain, usually uncluttered field, typically blue or blue/green color.

To find out the design of Antique Talish Oriental Rugs including photos, please continue reading here.


HEMP NATURAL FIBER

Hemp natural fiber is a variety of the Cannabis sativa plant and is grown specifically for the industrial uses of its derived products and is also called Industrial Hemp. It can be refined into a variety of commercial items including paper, textiles, clothing, biodegradable plastics, paint, insulation biofuel, food, animal feed, etc.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN INDUSTRIAL HEMP AND CANNABIS AS A DRUG

Both industrial hemp and cannabis as a drug are derived from the species Cannabis sativa. They both also contain the psychoactive tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), but they are distinct strains of the species.

Industrial hemp has lower concentrations of THC and higher concentrations of cannabidiol (CBD), which decreases or eliminates its psychoactive effects.

The legality issues involved with industrial hemp vary widely between countries, depending on the different drug laws of these countries. Some governments closely regulate the concentration of THC and will only permit hemp bred with a certain low percentage of THC.

Typically, hemp for industrial uses contains below 0.3% THC, while Cannabis grown for medicinal or recreational use can contain anywhere from 2% to over 20%. The fear that the growing of hemp will make it more difficult to control the use of the drug variety is still prevalent even though laws are gradually changing over time.

INDUSTRIAL HEMP

Hemp is probably one of the earliest plants to be cultivated. Hemp use archaeologically dates back to as far as the Neolithic Age in China around 12,000 years ago. The first identified coarse paper made from hemp goes back to the early Western Han Dynasty.

In Western Europe, the cultivation of hemp was not legally banned until the 1930s, but the commercial cultivation had stopped by then, due to decreased demand for and competition from increasingly popular artificial fibers.

In Japan, hemp was historically used as paper and as a fiber crop. In 1948, Marijuana was restricted as a narcotic drug in Japan even though it was never widely used there before. Hemp growers whose crop is used to make robes for Buddhist monks and loincloths for Sumo wrestlers were exempted.

Hemp is considered the strongest natural fiber in the world and is one of the fastest growing plants. In the U.S., George Washington and many other presidents cultivated hemp for rope. Levi Strauss patented his trouser jeans in 1873 from the indestructible sailcloth made from hemp!

HEMP PLANT PARTS

BAST

Hemp natural fiber is called bast and is one of the most valuable parts of the hemp plant. The bast are the fibers which grow on the outside of the plant stalk. It is these fibers that give the plants strength.    

There are different processes to remove the fiber from the stem. Depending on which process is used, the hemp may be creamy white, brown, gray, black or green. The hemp plant produces a high fiber yield per acre. It can produce 250% more fiber than cotton and 600% more fiber than flax with the same amount of land.

When grown as a fiber crop, hemp grows to a height of 6-15 feet and up to .75 inches in diameter without branching. To help ensure the plant grows straight, it is densely planted (as many as 300 plants per square yard).  

Hemp fiber has been used for centuries for the manufacture of industrial materials. It was commonly used to make sail canvas. In fact, the word 'canvas' is derived from the word 'cannabis.'  

Hemp fiber, when mixed with fiberglass, flax, and kenaf (a fiber plant native to east-central Africa), can be used to make composite panels for automobiles, including Audi, BMW, Ford, GM, Chrysler, Honda, etc. For apparel and furnishings, the fibers can be 100% hemp, though it is usually blended with other fibers including flax, cotton or silk, etc.

HURDS OR SHIVES

The hurds or shives are the woody inner parts of core of the hemp stem. These are broken into fragments and separated from the fiber. These parts are typically used for animal bedding or litter or for horticultural mulch.

HEMP SEEDS

Hemp seeds can be used in many ways. They can be eaten raw, ground into hemp meal, sprouted, or made into dried sprout powder. They can also be made into a liquid and used for baking or for beverages such as hemp milk and tea.  

Hemp seeds are important as a complete source of protein because they contain all the essential amino acids. The seeds are also exceptionally rich in 2 essential fatty acids - Omega-6 and Omega-3 in a healthy optimal ratio of 3 to 1 (6 to 3).  They have been shown to benefit skin diseases and provide relief from eczema.  

Hemp seeds are actually more nutritious and more economical to produce than soybeans and the protein in hemp seeds can be used to produce just about any product made from soybeans, such as tofu, veggie burgers, etc. It is also more digestible than soybeans and it does  not have to be cooked or fermented first.  

The seeds are also a great source of vitamin E and B vitamins and minerals such as phosphorus, potassium, sodium, magnesium, sulfur, calcium, iron, and zinc. They are also a great source of arginine and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) which have been linked to reduced risk of heart disease. The high levels of GLA may reduce symptoms associated with PMS and menopause as well.  

Whole hemp seeds contain high amounts of both soluble and insoluble fiber, which benefits digestive health. However, dehulled or shelled hemp seeds contain very little fiber.

Find much more information on hemp, its plant parts, cultivation, processing, uses, etc. as well as the future of hemp in the world and in the United States in particular, please continue reading here. 


PORTABLE HEATERS

Portable heaters may become a possible purchase option for those of us going through the ravages of a long, cold winter. Especially in sub-zero temperatures, we may need to boost the comfort level of our regular heating system to keep warm and snug in our homes. Fireplaces and electric blankets may help but may not be enough.  

Portable heaters can actually be less expensive to use, especially when the heat in only one room needs to be supplemented. When older persons or those sensitive to the cold are living in a home, it can actually be more economical to raise the heat in just one area without overheating the entire home.

PORTABLE HEATERS
SAFETY CONCERNS

There are important safety concerns that come with the use of portable heaters in the home. Accidental fires and burns, as well as electrical shock injuries from these devices are reported annually. 

In fact, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, more than 25,000 residential fires a year are associated with the use of portable heaters, resulting in more than 300 deaths. More than 6,000 burn injuries come just from contact with the hot surfaces of some of these heaters.


TYPES OF PORTABLE HEATERS

Portable heaters are typically vented or unvented. Vented ones are really not portable since they must be on an outside wall and vented through the wall or the ceiling or they are sealed combustion units which have a duct to bring outside air into the combustion chamber rather than using the inside air for combustion.

Unvented portable heaters can be combustion units, such as kerosene and natural gas heaters, which use the inside air for combustion, or they can be electric.  

Unvented combustion units should never be used inside homes because they deplete the air and bring combustion products into the home such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and water vapor.

Thus, for the purpose of this article, we will be talking about the use of electric portable heaters in the home. Although there is no concern with indoor air quality as with combustion units, they should be used with caution since they still pose fire, burn, and electrical shock hazards.

ELECTRIC PORTABLE HEATERS

What do you know about electric portable heaters? Today, they come in many different sizes and shapes, some of them are even made to look like small fireplaces.

Most electric portable heaters work by convection, which is the circulation of air in the room, while others use radiant heating. These emit infrared radiation, which heats people and and objects directly and may be a more  efficient choice for short-time use.

For convection (non-radiant) portable heaters, the best types incorporate a heat transfer liquid, such as oil, that is heated by the electric element. The heat transfer fluid provides some heat storage, allowing the heater to cycle less and to provide a more constant heat source.  

When shopping for portable heaters, it is important to consider how and where the heater will be used to help determine the size, shape and other options related to portable heater safety.

PORTABLE ELECTRIC HEATER  SAFETY TIPS

MEASURE THE AREA

Measure the area you wish to heat and make sure the device you purchase is sufficient for the space. An overworked heater can quickly become dangerous. And one that is too large for a room can overheat the room and be uncomfortable. Fortunately, most heaters have a general sizing table. 

CHECK FOR CERTIFICATION

Make sure the electric heater has testing laboratory certifications such as UL (Underwriters Laboratories), CSA (Canadian Standards Association), or ETL (Intertek Group). It would be best to purchase newer models that would most likely have all the current safety features.  

For the rest of the important safety tips when using portable electric heaters, please continue reading here.



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